Doomsayer for Doomsayers Strategy

I have been thinking lately of a career change. I might have found something: Doomsayer for Doomsayers. At first I thought about just being a doomsayer. (Yes, yes, I know the ‘mainstream’ calls them scientists or concerned citizens, but we all know the billionaire scientists run everything.) As I was saying, at first I thought about just being a doomsayer, but then I found out most of those jobs go to the scientist. To be a scientist you have to have credentials, work more than 40 hours a week, publish papers, beg for grants, study every day and actually pay attention to what you are talking about. While the pay was ok, it is not what I would call easy money.
Then, I found out about Doomsayer for Doomsayers (don’t call them deniers, they don’t like that for some reason). While sometimes you have to be a scientist, you don’t always have to be a scientist in the field. I have programmed for a few years, so maybe I could call myself a computer scientist and just drop the computer part. You don’t really have to work that hard. Research in the area is not required at all. In fact all you really have to do is just fly around to TV shows, radio, US and state legislators and says things like ‘the science is not all there’, ‘it is part of the natural process’, or whatever the script says this week. The best part of all is they are all well funded: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20122975/site/newsweek/
Of course, the only downside right now is the market is flooded with other slackers like me looking for that paycheck. So I figure the best thing is to create a new niche market. The market: fighting forest fires. Think about it, every fire I have ever seen burns itself out sooner or later. (See did research already.) Forest fires are a part of the natural process that has been going on for millions (or thousand depending on my audience) of years. The science is not all in yet, after all if all those fires had not been put out, we don’t know what would have happened. Until we stop putting out forest fires, we won’t really know. Plus, there might be some benefits: 1. easy access to all sorts of formally beautiful locations, 2. every burned down house is a chance to get a new home, 3. potential landfill locations and many more. We just need the time for all the science to get in.
All I need now is a well funded industry to back me. Oh, and if you are thinking of stealing my idea, too late, I patent it.